Found! 40 New Species in Virgin Brazil Rainforest

home_amapa2.jpg

Excerpts from
article
by Lewis Smith,
Times Environment Reporter

“Up to 40 new species of plants and animals, including a bird and a tree rat, have been discovered in an expedition to one of the world’s last unspoilt wildernesses.

newfrog_5f200px.jpg Researchers were particularly excited by the bird and the tree rat because new mammal and avian species are extremely rare. The discoveries have yet to be verified by peer review but Enrico Bernard, of Conservation International, is confident that 27 new species have been identified and that several more are contained among the thousands of specimens brought back for analysis.

lagarto_5f200px.jpg Besides the rat and the bird, the new species found include seven fish, eight frogs, lizards and snakes, two
shrimps and eight plants.
One species of lizard, [Amapasaurus tetradactylus], was rediscovered having been seen only twice before, both times in 1970. The lizard is unusual in having four fingers on its claws, whereas it closest relative has three.

“We have confirmed more than 1,700 species, of which more than 100 have been recorded for Amapá for the first time. Perhaps 40 of those are entirely new to science.

Among the creatures already known that were found in the region for the first time were 40 types of bat. Dr Enrico thought this if anything an underestimate. “There are potentially more than 100,” he added.The tree rat, from the genus makalata and the size of a large guinea-pig, lives with monkeys in the trees of the Amazonian tropical forest, where it eats only leaves and fruit.

The authorities in Brazil this week announced that 5.7 million hectares of the region is to be protected as the Amapá State Forest.”

Read the Full Aritcle at Times Online.

Thanks to Nutmeg for the scoop.

4 Responses to Found! 40 New Species in Virgin Brazil Rainforest

  1. storymask says:

    Isn’t Nature a great artist? The colors and patterns are inspirational.🙂

  2. Randy says:

    the lizard looks like a mali.

  3. Paul Radbourne says:

    I think you mean Amapsaurus tetradactylus

    • zaxy says:

      thanks, i copied it directly and apparently it was misreported on TimesOnline. i’ll email them to let them know.

      i couldn’t find it using your name, either- until i realized it has another ‘a’ in it:
      Amapasaurus tetradactylus is the correct taxonomic name for the species.🙂 thanks again, prof!

      ~Z

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